Disaster Recovery Journal Spring World 2016

DRJ Spring World 2016

Disaster Recovery Journal Spring World 2016 is taking place March 13-16, 2016 at Disney’s Coronado Spring Resort in Orlando, FL. We’re looking forward to another amazing show with numerous educational sessions and awesome people!

We have a lot planned during DRJ Spring World, and we hope you’ll join us:

Please take a look below for more details. We look forward to seeing you soon! Continue reading

Leading Response and Recovery Teams (Part 3)

LeadershipThis perspective is the third in a three-part series that addresses how to develop the skills necessary for being a successful leader in a crisis, including how a team leader can set the team’s purpose and bring order to the chaos that ensues following the onset of a disruptive event.  These two foundational team leader behaviors will help response and recovery team leaders elicit the best possible performance of the team (as well as themselves).

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this series, we addressed the role of the team leader, which is to create a team vision and purpose, as well as the team leader’s responsibility to manage the chaos associated with a disruptive event.  In this perspective, Part 3, we review the team leader’s role in ensuring the team remains adaptable in a changing environment and how the team leader can work to pull these key factors together. Continue reading

Leading Response and Recovery Teams (Part 2)

LeadershipTeam leaders play a critical role in improving business continuity for their organizations but seldom receive the appropriate training to help them understand the differences between day-to-day leadership and crisis leadership following the onset of a disruptive incident.

This perspective is the second in a three-part series that addresses how to develop the skills necessary for being a successful leader in a crisis, including how a team leader can set the team’s purpose and bring order to the chaos that ensues following the onset of a disruption.  These two foundational team leader behaviors will help elicit the best possible performance of the team (as well as themselves). Continue reading

We Just Did a BIA and Gap Analysis… Now What?

Sketch successful businessman concept, idea light bulbHow to Perform an Effective Business Continuity Strategy Identification and Selection Effort

Reader Note: This article is a continuation from Avalution’s November 2014 article titled: We just did a BIA and Risk Assessment … Now What? How to Perform an Effective Business Continuity Gap AnalysisIf your organization just finished a business impact analysis (BIA) and risk assessment, but has not yet performed a gap analysis, it may be helpful to read about performing an effective gap analysis before continuing on to this article.

Once an organization understands gaps between business continuity requirements (as defined in the business impact and risk assessment) and current capabilities, management can determine which gaps they wish to address through strategy selection – either through risk mitigation or resource-specific recovery methods.  Determining methods to decrease the likelihood of a disruptive incident reduces the potential that a risk will materialize, while identifying methods to respond to and recover from a disruptive incident decreases downtime and protects the organizations’ brand and financial position (among other assets). Continue reading

Treating the Causes of Bad Business Continuity Training Programs

Faults & Fixes SeriesFaults & Fixes: Bad Training

As business continuity professionals, we tend to gravitate to the activities where we think we can deliver the most value. This often takes the form of the business impact analysis, helping management come up with strategies that minimize risk, and documenting these strategies into plans. Ensuring that a business continuity program employs effective training approaches and engages business process owners, unfortunately, often plays “second fiddle” to other activities. One only needs to browse any of the top business continuity and disaster recovery related publications to see this disparity. Searching for “business impact analysis” or “business continuity plan” yields substantially more results than “business continuity training.” Yet without effective training, all that hard work will likely either fail or not perform to desired standards during a real disruptive incident. Continue reading

How-To: Effectively Scope Your Business Continuity Program

Program_ScopeEarly on in the development of a business continuity program, careful, pragmatic scoping can be the difference between quick and appropriate wins and a never-ending planning effort with little capability.  Organizations typically build programs due to customer and/or regulatory requirements; however, instead of taking the time to carefully scope and prioritize the business continuity effort (and provide resources accordingly), organizations often take an “all or nothing” approach to planning – plan for every “box on the org chart”, every facility, every application, and every resource.  Many organizations do not realize that business continuity can, and often should, initially address an organization’s most critical/time-sensitive products and services, expanding to other parts of the organization overtime.  Continue reading

Why Testing and Exercising is Essential for an Effective Business Continuity Program

BCAW 2015 LogoThis post is part of the Business Continuity Awareness Week (BCAW) 2015 flashblog. To learn more about The BCI and BCAW 2015, visit the website or follow the discussion on Twitter via #BCAW2015 and #TestingTimes.

Exercising. Whether you’re talking about hitting the gym or testing your business continuity strategies and plans, I’ve come to find that no one likes hearing this word. The typical reaction and excuses are similar, too: I don’t have the time; I have better things to do; I just don’t see the value.

Well, okay… the last one pertains a bit more to business continuity, but I’m sure you get my point. Continue reading

Risky Business (Part 2): Too Lean, Too Late

Risky Business - Supply ChainMany organizations today aim to make operations as lean as possible. But, in doing so, are these organizations unknowingly increasing the risk of operational downtime and excess cost? Due to streamlining operations and eliminating redundant activities or suppliers, one misstep or disruption (either internally or externally), can result in time-consuming and costly operational delays, or much worse, impact market positioning or even threaten the survival of the organization.

This perspective is part two of a supply chain risk management-focused series called “Risky Business”. In part one, Managing Third-Party and Supplier Risk, we discussed the importance of protecting your organization from risks associated with a dependence on suppliers (and service providers), as well as how to analyze potential impacts and prioritize these risks.

In this perspective we’ll discuss the specific business continuity strategies and risk treatment options available to mitigate the risk associated with supplier dependencies to an acceptable level. Continue reading

What You Need to Know: Cloud Computing and Business Continuity

The_CloudCloud computing is potentially the most important technology development of this decade, so business continuity professionals should rightly be asking: “What does it really mean and how does it affect me?” This perspective is designed to address common questions about cloud computing.

What is the Cloud?
Bottom-line – it is a marketing term. Like all great marketing terms, it can be used to mean anything, and thus, it actually means very little. For our purposes, I’d like to suggest the following explanations for “the cloud”, which have proven broadly true in practical experience: Continue reading

Failing Back Home Can Trip You Up

In the last month alone, I’ve worked with two companies that had IT disruptions but didn’t use their IT disaster recovery (DR) plans because they weren’t sure if they could fail back home (aka return to normal). In both cases, these concerns were a surprise to the executive management team.

It’s a theme I’ve heard many times before – the IT disaster recovery solution was built without considering how the organization would return to the primary data center from the disaster recovery location. This perspective highlights some key issues to consider regarding the use of the IT disaster recovery strategy. Continue reading